Getting thrifty through a family journey

Lloyds opened one-stop resale store after career change, health obstacles

BY BRUCE MILLS bruce@theitem.com
Posted 12/7/18

What started off as a hobby has turned into a career for Rodney and Stacey Lloyd with This-N-That Thrift Store.

After years of buying secondhand clothes and other household goods from yard sales and flea markets and then selling them on eBay, the …

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Getting thrifty through a family journey

Lloyds opened one-stop resale store after career change, health obstacles

Posted

What started off as a hobby has turned into a career for Rodney and Stacey Lloyd with This-N-That Thrift Store.

After years of buying secondhand clothes and other household goods from yard sales and flea markets and then selling them on eBay, the Lloyds decided to go into the resale shop business for themselves in 2013. They are now located at 673 W. Liberty St.

At that time, Rodney Lloyd quit his career as a steel fabricator and welder, cashed in his 401K and the couple set out to pursue their "dream" of having a family owned thrift store.

In March of that year, Stacey Lloyd got sick, and doctors couldn't figure out the cause. Three months later in June 2013, she collapsed and spent 16 days in an intensive care unit with respiratory failure caused by sleep apnea.

Two months after having a tracheotomy and being released from the hospital, the Lloyds opened their first thrift store in a small building in Wedgefield.

"In August, we had to open the store," Rodney Lloyd said. "The 401K had to sustain us because of Stacey's illness; so, we used up all our reserves before we actually had a chance to open."

In the years since then, Stacey's health has improved somewhat. She no longer has a tracheotomy tube but sleeps with a CPAP machine over her face that supplies her with air.

The business has grown by leaps and bounds, they said, expanding twice, and is now based in a 5,000-square-foot facility on one of the city's busiest streets.

The Lloyds credit This-N-That's success to only buying good-quality merchandise for resale. They get their wide selection of items (with everything from furniture, kids play sets, appliances and clothes to DVDs and even vinyl music albums) from yard sales, auctions, estate sales and flea markets, among other places.

They "clean it and fix it" if necessary "and even put batteries in it," Rodney Lloyd said.

"If it's something we wouldn't use personally, then we don't bring it into the store," he said. "Our belief is most people who shop thrift stores are lower-income people with limited resources. We've been those people and are those people. But just because you don't have a lot of money doesn't mean you only should be offered trash and dirty merchandise. So, we try to find as high quality as we can at the lowest price and then sell it to our customers at a discount that they can't get anywhere else."

This-N-That has more than 1,000 likes and followers on Facebook and even has repeat customers from neighboring counties, the Lloyds said.

The Lloyds have a 20-year-old son, Shane, who now works in the family business.

Rodney Lloyd said he has no regrets on his career change and getting out of the steel business.

"I am not making the money I was making back then, but I am happier and healthier for it," he said. "And, I get to spend time with my wife and my son and try to build something for him when we're not here. And for that, I won't trade it for anything. That's why I put all I have into it."