Sumter hospital unveils coloring book to Lemira Elementary students

Palmetto Health Tuomey in second year of partnership with South Sumter school

BY BRUCE MILLS
bruce@theitem.com
Posted 2/23/18

It really does "take a village to raise a child," if you ask Palmetto Health Tuomey.

And in the spirit of the saying, the hospital extended its community partnership with Lemira Elementary School on Thursday at the school with the unveiling of a …

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Sumter hospital unveils coloring book to Lemira Elementary students

Palmetto Health Tuomey in second year of partnership with South Sumter school

Posted

It really does "take a village to raise a child," if you ask Palmetto Health Tuomey.

And in the spirit of the saying, the hospital extended its community partnership with Lemira Elementary School on Thursday at the school with the unveiling of a new coloring book showcasing careers in the hospital.

Tuomey began its partnership with the South Sumter school last school year and has extended it this year, according to hospital process engineer and lead volunteer Kimberly Rauschenbach.

After visiting Lemira a few times last year and participating in a "career fair" day at the school, she learned the elementary school students knew that hospitals employed doctors and nurses, but they didn't know any of the other jobs or careers at a hospital.

Rauschenbach said she told them there were many other valuable jobs in a hospital, even though they might go on behind the scenes.

"We wanted to be able to teach these children about careers and reach them in a way they could understand," Rauschenbach said.

She said she thought of doing something like the A to Z of jobs in the hospital with just coloring sheets to hand out to students at the school. She said she pitched the idea to the hospital's marketing and communications team, and it came up with the idea of the full-scale, activity coloring book.

The book, titled Are You My Job?, details hospital careers starting with all 26 letters of the alphabet for students at the school.

For the letter "A," the careers of athletic trainers and accountants are described. "T" is for transporters who use wheelchairs and rolling beds to move patients around inside the hospital, according to the book. "X" is for X-ray technicians (of course), who take pictures of the inside of the body. "Z" represents those individuals who help people get their "ZZZZZ"s if they are not sleeping well - sleep doctors.

About a dozen hospital staff members from various careers were on hand Thursday for the unveiling of the coloring book to second-graders at Lemira.

Sonya McDaniel, clinical respiratory care manager at Palmetto Health Tuomey, discussed with the second-graders the importance of respiratory therapists in helping patients who have trouble breathing.

Tuomey guest relations representative Darion Canty talked about his job ensuring patients and visitors have a positive experience at the hospital.

Shawn Gilroy, an interventional technologist at Tuomey, a type of X-ray technician, said he was impressed with the second-graders' knowledge and questions.

"They were like: 'What about this bone and that bone?' and 'the chest protects the heart,'" Gilroy said. "They asked some good questions. These are smart kids."

The entire second-grade class of about 91 students at Lemira took part in the up-close and personal look at hospital careers.

Jaidynn Wilson, 7, said he liked learning about the job of transporter at the hospital.

Eight-year-old Katelynn Johnson said she also enjoyed learning about the transporter.

"You get to put people in the wheelchair and have conversations with them," Johnson said.

Fellow 8-year-old Yuleidy Garcia said she most enjoyed learning about nurses.

"The nurse checks you and finds out if you feel bad and takes shots if you have the flu," Garcia said. "They take really good care of you."

The coloring book was funded for the hospital by a grant from The Tuomey Foundation, a philanthropic arm that supports the mission of Palmetto Health Tuomey.

Rauschenbach said the goal of the hospital's partnership with Lemira is to help the kids learn to dream big.

"You can't dream it until you know what it is," Rauschenbach said.