New on-demand delivery app launches at Shaw, in Sumter

JoyRun provides peer-to-peer food, errands service

BY KAYLA ROBINS kayla@theitem.com
Posted 7/6/18

An app that lets the community help each other out with everyday errands and necessities has made its way to Sumter.

JoyRun is a peer-to-peer social app platform that allows people to pick up items and deliver them to others. Based in Silicon …

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New on-demand delivery app launches at Shaw, in Sumter

JoyRun provides peer-to-peer food, errands service

Posted

An app that lets the community help each other out with everyday errands and necessities has made its way to Sumter.

JoyRun is a peer-to-peer social app platform that allows people to pick up items and deliver them to others. Based in Silicon Valley, the app is used on campuses nationwide and launched in Sumter and at Shaw Air Force Base in February, according to Courtney Hammond, marketing manager for JoyRun Inc.

"It's not like Uber Eats. When you're at work, you can request staples. Someone says 'I'll give you $3 for that.' There are no paid employees," Hammond said.

Unlike Uber Eats or other delivery services, JoyRun works at any restaurants or any store, as long as a runner wants to go there.

Runners pay $0-$5 out of their pocket, and the app refunds them for runs within 30 minutes. The community members who run the errands for you and deliver are required to log in through Facebook, making privacy and secrecy unable to lead to unidentified crime or robberies like Craigslist.

Hammond said she made $2,500 in three months.

Fortune said JoyRun is "giving [flexible earning options] to anyone in the community," according to a review posted on the JoyRun website. A review posted on the site from Spoon University at Boise State says, "JoyRun is reinventing the way college students do food," and Inc. said "JoyRun has that rarest of things for an on-demand startup: a unique business model."

To deliver to Shaw, runners need base access, she said. People requesting a runner can deny and get a new person to make the run if they don't feel comfortable.

She said the majority of runners are women and veterans because they can take their kids to work with them.

The idea started in 2015 with a Silicon Valley CEO for college campuses, where students may think "I have a car and you don't. I'll go grab this for you," Hammond said. Now, a new push is to help people on military bases.

There have been more than 500 downloads locally, she said. Overall, JoyRun has paid more than $2 million to runners.

The app is free to download.

For more information, visit www.joyrun.com or contact Hammond at courtney.joyrun@gmail.com or (803) 468-2328.