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Charleston-based medical novel based on writer's real-life experiences in ER

Author will sign books in February at Sumter County Museum

BY KAYLA ROBINS
kayla@theitem.com
Posted 12/17/19

A former emergency room physician will talk in Sumter about her second novel following the critical acclaim of her first.

Kimmery Martin will be at the Sumter County Museum on Feb. 19, 2020, at 5:30 p.m. for a discussion and book signing of "The …

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Charleston-based medical novel based on writer's real-life experiences in ER

Author will sign books in February at Sumter County Museum

PHOTO PROVIDED
Posted

A former emergency room physician will talk in Sumter about her second novel following the critical acclaim of her first.

Kimmery Martin will be at the Sumter County Museum on Feb. 19, 2020, at 5:30 p.m. for a discussion and book signing of "The Antidote for Everything," a story of two Charleston-based physicians battling injustice and confronting the reality of drug addiction among colleagues. The story has a character who tells us early on that "there is an antidote to everything. Some things you just have to figure out what it is."

Her second novel is described as a combination of the medical intrigue of "Grey's Anatomy" with the humor, friendship and suburban drama of Liane Moriarty and is inspired by the real-life experience of a fellow physician, focusing on what happens when a doctor is fired for treating transgender patients.

Harnessing her experience as an ER physician, Martin, a graduate of the University of Louisville School of Medicine with a residency at Vanderbilt University who is currently on hiatus from the medical world to focus on her writing, explores powerful conflicts between doctors and policy-makers in determining patient care.

Urologist Georgia Brown and her best friend, primary care physician Jonah Tsukada, are compassionate doctors with a serious commitment to the Hippocratic oath - to treat all their fellow human beings in need. Inexplicably, however, when the novel opens, many of Jonah's patients are leaving his practice, and Georgia hears a rumor that some of her friend's patients have had problems with his care.

Not until she attends a medical convention in Europe does she learn via text from Jonah the truth behind his dwindling practice: Administrators have ruled some of Jonah's patients do not "fit" their clinic's parameters and sent those patients letters not to return.

As the pages turn, both physicians face the loss of their jobs in their refusal to knuckle under to prejudice, and an ironic twist develops. Jonah learns one of the influential physicians on the committee scrutinizing his practice steals drugs from the clinic to satisfy his addiction.

This knowledge presents Jonah with a dilemma that leads to a startling conclusion regarding both his and Georgia's careers.

Martin reviews books, interviews authors and works extensively with the library foundation in Charlotte, where she lives.