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City of Sumter to start seeking funding for Calhoun Street improvements

BY SHELBIE GOULDING
shelbie@theitem.com
Posted 11/7/19

New plans addressing traffic and safety on Calhoun Street may include features such as bicycle lanes and new street lighting. Sumter City Council addressed a traffic calming study conducted in 2016 and started searching for funding to improve …

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City of Sumter to start seeking funding for Calhoun Street improvements

Posted

New plans addressing traffic and safety on Calhoun Street may include features such as bicycle lanes and new street lighting. Sumter City Council addressed a traffic calming study conducted in 2016 and started searching for funding to improve traffic and safety on Calhoun Street during Tuesday's council meeting.

George McGregor, planning director for the Sumter City-County Planning Department, brought the updated plans, created based on the 2016 Hampton Park Historic District Traffic Calming Study, before the council.

They call for the city to add median diversions, four-way stops, high-visibility crosswalks, bicycle lanes and street lighting down Calhoun Street, which stretches across Sumter's Downtown Historic District. With these additions down Calhoun Street, the planning commission said it should improve safety and calm traffic in the residential area.

Councilman Steve Corley said about 70% of the city's traffic travels down Calhoun Street daily, which is high for a residential community street.

Council unanimously approved to move forward and begin searching for the funding to put toward the project. Councilman Thomas Lowery was absent.

Council tests county's new voting machines

Also on Tuesday, the Sumter County Election Commission appeared before council to demonstrate its new voting machines.

The new machines are paper-based, where the voter inserts a blank paper strip into the machine and selects candidates by touch screen. When finished, the voter retrieves the now printed ballot, looks it over and then places it in the scanner, which electronically tallies the votes. The paper is then dropped in a ballet box within the locked scanner machine.

Both Councilman Colin Davis and Councilman Calvin Hastie tried out the new voting machines to understand the process.

City looking into legality of disallowing nursing homes in residential districts

Applicant James Crawley has requested the city amend Article III to remove nursing and personal care, adult care/adult day care, individual and family social services, residential care facilities, rooming and boarding houses and organizational hotels and lodging facilities from the list of conditional uses in the residential-6 and residential-9 districts.

During City Council's Oct. 15 meeting, residents and residential business owners aired concerns about the amendment request through a public hearing.

After a 25-minute executive session, council unanimously approved first reading and said it will make sure the request is in compliance with the law. Two readings must be passed before a proposal or ordinance is passed.