Former Clarendon deputy's widow invited to State of Union address

BY SHARRON HALEY
Special to The Sumter Item
Posted 2/1/19

SUMMERTON - Jodi Woods Moore, the widow of former Clarendon County deputy Mason Moore, has been invited to attend President Donald J. Trump's State of the Union Address on Tuesday.

Moore was issued the invitation by Montana Sen. Steve …

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Former Clarendon deputy's widow invited to State of Union address

Posted

SUMMERTON - Jodi Woods Moore, the widow of former Clarendon County deputy Mason Moore, has been invited to attend President Donald J. Trump's State of the Union Address on Tuesday.

Moore was issued the invitation by Montana Sen. Steve Daines.

Moore has been active in raising awareness of the sacrifices of fallen officers.

Moore's late husband, Mason Moore, was gunned down while attempting to make a traffic stop in rural Montana in May 2017.

Moore, a former resident of Summerton, had been working as a deputy with the Broadwater County Sheriff's Office in Montana for four years after serving as a deputy with the Clarendon County Sheriff's Office for nine years.

Last week, a bill was presented to the Montana House of Representatives by Rep. Julie Dooling.

"I am honored to be able to present this bill to the House," Dooling said last week. "Deputy Moore gave the ultimate sacrifice, and I believe his efforts needed to be recognized."

Dooling said she thought the bill would pass through Montana's House and Senate chambers with little or no opposition.

"I feel confident that my fellow members of the House and Senate will support this bill," Dooling added.

On Monday, Broadwater County Sheriff Wynn Meehan confirmed that the Montana House passed a bill named in Moore's honor.

"It passed the first two readings as well as the final reading unanimously," Meehan said. "That's pretty significant in itself. For three readings to pass without opposition, that says a lot. The bill goes to committee and then to the Senate. I believe the bill will pass through there with total support."

Meehan said he asked for something new when he requested the memorial honoring Moore.

"Usually they name a stretch of road maybe six to eight miles long," Meehan added. "That's not what I wanted. That's too much. I don't want people to think of events every time they ride that route. I don't want them to think it's a bad spot. I want them to have a little more peace. I want the location where Mason was killed to be more significant. He was a man of peace, a good man. I want him remembered for all the good he did."

Meehan said that once the bill passes the House and Senate and it's signed into law that two posts will mark the location where Moore was killed. Signs on the posts will bear Moore's name, title and date of passing as well as his badge number.

"The posts should be in place before the anniversary of Mason's death," Meehan added.