Montana to name highway after fallen deputy Moore, a Manning native

BY SHARRON HALEY
Special to The Sumter Item
Posted 3/8/19

MANNING - A portion of U.S. 287 near Three Forks, Montana, will be named after Broadwater County Sheriff's Deputy Mason Moore, who died in the line of duty at that location in May 2017.

"Our great states lost a wonderful father, husband, son and …

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Montana to name highway after fallen deputy Moore, a Manning native

Posted

MANNING - A portion of U.S. 287 near Three Forks, Montana, will be named after Broadwater County Sheriff's Deputy Mason Moore, who died in the line of duty at that location in May 2017.

"Our great states lost a wonderful father, husband, son and friend," Montana Gov. Steve Bullock told The Sumter Item last week. "We are safer and stronger because of the daily courage, commitment and sacrifice of this hero. Mason is greatly missed but will never be forgotten."

Before joining the Broadwater County Sheriff's Office, Moore, a native of Manning, worked for the University of South Carolina Police Department, Lexington County Sheriff's Office and the Clarendon County Sheriff's Office. Moore had been with the BCSO for three years before his death.

In late January, the Montana House of Representatives unanimously passed House Bill 156, the bill that would authorize the naming of the highway in Moore's honor, and forwarded the bill to the Montana Senate, where that body passed the bill by a vote of 48-2 in mid-February. The bill then headed to Bullock's office to be signed into law. Bullock signed the bill on Feb. 26.

Broadwater County Sheriff Wynn Meeham said in February that once the bill is signed into law that two posts will be placed near mile marker 109 on U.S. 287 at the location where Moore was killed. Meeham said the signs will bear Moore's name, title, date of passing and his badge number.

"I don't want people to think of events every time they ride that route," Meeham said. "I don't want them to think it's a bad spot. I want them to have a little more peace. I want that location where Mason was killed to be more significant. He was a man of peace, a good man. I want him remembered for all of the good he did."

Moore was gunned down while attempting to make a traffic stop about 3 a.m. on May 16, 2017, in the Three Forks area. After radioing the local dispatch of his traffic stop, communications with dispatch stopped, and officers were dispatched to his location. Those officers reported finding Moore dead from gunshot wounds. Moore's dashboard camera revealed to investigators what transpired immediately after he radioed in the traffic stop. The camera revealed a period of silence, then moaning and the sound of a door opening followed by more gunshots. Investigators reported finding 20 refile casings near Moore's body and an additional 10 casings found on the highway.

Lloyd Burrus, 61, and his son, Marshall, 38, were spotted shortly after the shooting. They led authorities on a 30-mile chase before exiting their vehicle and shooting at law enforcement officers. Marshall Burrus was shot in the head and died one day later. His father was arrested and charged with two counts of accountability for attempted deliberate homicide and 14 counts of attempted deliberate homicide. His bond was set at $2 million. No trial date has been set for Burrus. He has been found to be unfit to stand trial.