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One simple dot: Kingsbury Elementary activities based on popular book promote creativity, confidence

BY SHELBIE GOULDING
shelbie@theitem.com
Posted 9/14/19

A simple dot can take you anywhere. At least that's what students at Kingsbury Elementary learned on International Dot Day on Friday.

Based on the popular children's book, "The Dot," by Peter H. Reynolds, the Kingsbury STEAM team and …

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One simple dot: Kingsbury Elementary activities based on popular book promote creativity, confidence

Posted

A simple dot can take you anywhere. At least that's what students at Kingsbury Elementary learned on International Dot Day on Friday.

Based on the popular children's book, "The Dot," by Peter H. Reynolds, the Kingsbury STEAM team and administration challenged teachers to use the book to incorporate activities all day long that teach students to make their mark and see where it takes them.

STEAM stands for a curriculum centered around science, technology, engineering, arts and math.

"The STEAM committee chose The Dot book for International Dot Day. It's just where we develop lessons based upon that story," said Diane Smith, a third-grade teacher.

"The Dot" is about a young girl named Vashti who thinks she can't draw. One day, her teacher tells her to just make a mark and see where it takes her. She grabbed a marker and made a simple dot, which blossomed her artistic talent. The Dot Day and the book helped students build their creativity and critical thinking skills in lessons throughout the day. Smith said teachers used the story to help students learn how to be brave and be who they are with confidence.

Each classroom had different lessons to teach using the book and simple dots. Michelle Blassengale, the music teacher, taught her students how using a dot can create beautiful, unique music.

She had students fingerprint their own music notes to create a class sound together.

"It was interesting sounds of random music," Blassengale said. "I call it 'chance music' because we give it a chance."

Blassengale said she enjoyed teaching this activity because it was personal to the students and turned out well when it was finished.

Stephanie McCormick taught her kindergarten class how to work together in groups to create something of their own using the candy Dots and toothpicks.

Leroy Steigerwalt tested his fifth-grade classes with mathematical problem-solving skills with the use of dots.

Barbara Hale and her assistant teacher, Lakesha Meredith, used candy Dots and toothpicks to build homes from the Three Little Pigs book with their students in the school's STEAM Lab. The students split into groups to build homes that the big bad wolf (a fan) couldn't blow down.

Kingsbury plans to keep celebrating International Dot Day each year to give students a fun, creative learning experience that helps them build confidence in themselves during the school year.