Keep Reading. Subscribe Today.

Stay connected with our community and support nationally-acclaimed local news coverage. Sign up for a subscription today. Cancel anytime.

  • Already a subscriber?

Reflections by Sammy Way: Item photographer featured in Chinese paper

By SAMMY WAY
Archivist and historian
Posted 3/28/20

Reflections remembers the accomplishments of Heyward Crowson in China during World War II. In October of 1945, Mrs. Ruth Crowson received from her husband, who was serving in the Marine Corps, a copy of the Chinese-English Intelligence paper from …

This item is available in full to subscribers

Reflections by Sammy Way: Item photographer featured in Chinese paper

Posted

Reflections remembers the accomplishments of Heyward Crowson in China during World War II. In October of 1945, Mrs. Ruth Crowson received from her husband, who was serving in the Marine Corps, a copy of the Chinese-English Intelligence paper from Tientsin, China, dated Oct. 6.

It was printed in Chinese characters; however, it was translated into English following each paragraph. The ensuing article published in the Chinese paper recognized Mr. Crowson's photographic documentation of the Japanese surrender in China. A degree of editing was required because of the length of the article. The article used was published in The Sumter Daily Item, and photos were supplied by the Crowson family.

"At about 3 o'clock on October 1 an American warrior (soldier) visited our office. He was to take advantage of the roof of our office to take pictures while the troops were passing. Then he was led to the platform from which the whole street was visible." It was at this point that Heyward Crowson took photos of the official surrender of Japanese assets in China.

"He said he had flown to Taku only a few days before on board a B-29 'Superfortress' used by a number of photographers. Prior to that he had been in Pearl Harbor and Okinawa. He was impressed with Tientsin and the Tientsinese people. He stated that nowhere have we been so warmly and cordially welcomed."

"After he had taken several pictures our chief invited him to our office and offered him tea. He accepted warmly and modestly. Some of the Chinese addressed him as a brave fighter, some called him a savior. He was very interested and concerned about the treatment the Chinese had received under Japanese rule. Our conversation lasted about half an hour. As he was too busy to talk with us any longer, he shook hands with each of us and said 'au revoir.'"