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Reflections with Sammy Way: Stateburg developed on King's Highway

By SAMMY WAY
Archivist and historian
Posted 2/15/20

Part 2 of Reflections continues its perusal of the Stateburg community with photos of several churches and estates which comprised this historic settlement. The Stateburg community dates back to the 1700s.

The research data and photos used to …

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Reflections with Sammy Way: Stateburg developed on King's Highway

Posted

Part 2 of Reflections continues its perusal of the Stateburg community with photos of several churches and estates which comprised this historic settlement. The Stateburg community dates back to the 1700s.

The research data and photos used to prepare this article were taken from The Sumter Item archives. In part one, three historic sites were featured. Find part one at www.theitem.com.

Stateburg was "once the center of life for some of South Carolina's most distinguished citizens."

The "Village of Stateburg" was developed along both sides of the second-oldest public road in the state. This former Catawba Indian hunting trail which ended in Charleston served as the principal thoroughfare for all traffic to and from the upcountry and South Carolina's capital city. Prior to the Revolutionary War, the road was commonly known as the King's Highway.

This area was built in part by "wealthy South Carolina Lowcountry families who built summer homes in the high hills of the Santee."

The highway served as the main street of the community which began to expand during the late 1700s. The land was sold in lots which measured 105 feet in width to 200 feet in depth. Several smaller lots were reserved to provide space for the construction of various offices and stores.

The village was centrally located some 100 miles northwest of Charleston and nearly 20 miles southeast of Camden, which placed it near the geographic center of the state.

This information is made possible through the research, recollections, and documents preserved and obtained by Thomas Sebastian Sumter, Anne King Gregorie and Cassie Nicholes.